Local Dredging Companies Question Value of Fish Surveys

By Provenzo, Matt | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 2, 2007 | Go to article overview

Local Dredging Companies Question Value of Fish Surveys


Provenzo, Matt, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Three commercial dredging companies are appealing recent state requirements that make them survey fish populations in new permit areas to extract sand and gravel from the Allegheny and Ohio rivers.

A Kittanning-based dredging company, Glacial Sand and Gravel, along with Hanson Aggregates PMA in New Kensington and Tri-State River Products of Beaver are bucking the new requirement for fish surveys because the studies are costly and scientifically questionable and could further restrict permitted areas for dredging, according to one dredger.

Every five years, commercial dredgers that work in the Allegheny and Ohio rivers -- rich in sand and gravel harvested for road projects and building materials -- have to renew their permits with several regulatory agencies including the state Department of Environmental Protection.

Current permits allow dredging in designated sections of the Allegheny River -- pools 4, 5, 7, and 8, stretching from Harrison Township in Allegheny County to Washington Township in Armstrong County, and in the Montgomery and New Cumberland pools of the Ohio River in Beaver County.

The state Fish and Boat Commission recommended doing the pre- dredge surveys to determine numbers and species in the water.

The DEP renewed the dredging permits in June of 2006, but added new, first-time requirements for pre-dredging surveys of mussels and fish, tests of the oxygen levels in the water and funding for habitat restoration. The dredgers accepted all the new requirements except the fish survey.

The newly required fish studies "serve no purpose except to generate data on the how many and what types of fish are present generally in the river which is surveyed," said Mark Snyder, corporate secretary for Glacial Sand and Gravel, which filed appeal with the Pennsylvania Environmental Hearing Board last year. The surveys "do not and cannot tell you whether a fish will be affected by dredging or whether dredging has had any effects on fish, nor do they tell you anything about long-term 'fish habitat,'" Snyder said.

The dredging companies' appeal focuses on a long-running debate on whether dredging is harmful to fish populations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Local Dredging Companies Question Value of Fish Surveys
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.