Catering to the 'Pro-Weird'

Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 2, 2007 | Go to article overview

Catering to the 'Pro-Weird'


WASHINGTON -- We live is a state of "crises."

There's the obesity crisis. Twenty percent of all the residents in 47 states are considered "obese." Fifteen percent of kids between 6 and 17 are afflicted.

Of course, ancient forms of exercise now are largely banned. Every public play area that we visit has removed slides and any piece of equipment from which an excited boy or girl might fall, running is forbidden in many school playgrounds and the old game of tag is ostracized.

Festive season or not, never even allow the thought of cigarettes. And we must all remember with proper horror the scent of cigars and the fragrance of smoke from a pipe.

In the early part of the last century, great English writer G.K. Chesterton captured the concept of "crises" quite well:

"The free man owns himself. He can damage himself with either eating or drinking; he can ruin himself with gambling. If he does he is certainly a damn fool but if he may not, he is not a free man any more than a dog!"

And that is where our politically correct society and the nanny government are rushing us.

Worse, our federal nabobs, by their own admission, use "perception management" to manipulate information. False and frightening information cobbled together by the security and intelligence complex is fed to the media, one that gets a bonus for being first with the news but not the most accurate.

Which brings us to John Walter Rendon, the chief of a Washington public relations firm that provides information services to a wide range of clients in nearly 80 countries. In a Rolling Stone magazine article (which won a 2006 National Magazine Award), Rendon describes himself as "an information warrior, and a perception manager."

Rendon's introduction to the world of politics was as campaign manager in 1972 in Maine for the lost causes of George McGovern. Rendon was a mastermind of Michael Dukakis' successful campaign for the Massachusetts state House and was an executive of the Democratic National Committee during the flawed era of Jimmy Carter and his flawed bid for re-election. …

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Catering to the 'Pro-Weird'
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