Chocolate Candy Story Has Happy Ending

By Ross, John | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 6, 2008 | Go to article overview

Chocolate Candy Story Has Happy Ending


Ross, John, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Dear Dog Talk: Even the most careful, loving dog guardian can make a mistake that can threaten the life of their pet. I made such a mistake yesterday. Thank God, it has a happy ending. Perhaps this story could serve as a cautionary note to Dog Talk readers.

Yesterday, I brought home from work a bag of holiday Hershey's kisses, which had been given to me by a co-worker. I left the chocolates in the bag I always take to work, in which I carry newspapers and mail, and put it on the floor. When I returned from a walk with my two collies, the bag had been unsealed, and I found pieces of crumpled foil on the floor. As many as 20 or 25 Kisses were missing from the bag.

The chocolates had been eaten by Scooter, my 22-pound Boston terrier. He was the only one at home during our walk.

I was horrified, knowing full well the potential damage chocolate can cause to dogs. Chocolate is especially dangerous to a small dog.

I called our 24-hour-a-day veterinarian's office, which is located not far from my home. I was told that given how much chocolate he must have eaten, vomiting should be induced. I did not know that hydrogen peroxide also could be used to induce vomiting in my dog. We did not have Syrup of Ipecac at home. However, hydrogen peroxide is something that we had, so we used it. It did the trick.

My wife arrived home from work minutes after I discovered what had happened. She was able to get him to consume a couple of capfuls of the liquid, as we were instructed. Within 10 minutes, all of the chocolate was eliminated from his system. Scooter is fine, and I am happy and more thankful than I can express in words.

We must be careful to protect our cherished pets, especially around the holidays. Anyone can make a mistake. Thank heavens this mistake I was able to undo.

Dear Careful With Dog Kisses: Wow, great letter. This is information that all dog owners should be aware of, particularly during the holiday season when there are lots of treats around the house.

Other food items that can be potentially dangerous to dog are grapes, raisins, onions and turkey. Dog Talk readers, let's all keep a close eye on our canine family members, not just during the holiday festivities but all year long, so they stay safe. …

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