The Blue Card Scare

By Sanchez, Rob | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 2, 2008 | Go to article overview

The Blue Card Scare


Sanchez, Rob, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Intel Corp. Chairman Craig Barrett recently made dire predictions that the next Silicon Valley will not be in the United States because of restrictive immigration policies and that a brain drain from the United States to Europe will cause an economic Armageddon.

In his hypothetical scenario, the United States would lose out in the competition for talent as the best inventors and entrepreneurs migrate to Europe.

This scaremongering is a smoke screen to hide Barrett's desire to increase the labor supply, thereby slashing labor costs.

High-tech industries such as Intel routinely make false claims that there are shortages of qualified Americans. Anecdotal claims of shortages are touted in order to make the corporate case for increasing the number of H-1B visas. Several recent studies, such as one by the Urban Institute, prove that the United States is creating fewer high-tech jobs than the number of qualified people who are entering the work force.

Intel's claims that it can't find enough talented workers is dubious, especially considering that Intel is eliminating thousands of jobs in locations such as New Mexico, California and Oregon. If Intel is having such a tough time finding qualified workers, why are they firing so many workers already in their employ?

Barrett asks us to take a leap of faith when he warns that worldwide shortages of high-tech workers are endemic. He furthers his argument by saying that Europe will win the competition to attract scarce talent when the European Union institutes a new visa called the "blue card." Like the H-1B visa in the United States, the blue card would be a temporary guest-worker visa that indentures each worker to the employer.

Other similarities between the H-1B visa and the blue card include their not-so-subtle purpose of undercutting and replacing more expensive domestic work forces. Both the blue card and H-1B visa offer temporary employment and after a set number of years a path to citizenship.

If passed, Europe would not be able to use blue cards to drain our human capital because both continents have worker gluts, not shortages. There is an even more obvious reason none of this is likely to happen: Europe doesn't have a blue card program yet and it's just as likely that it never will.

European labor groups have been resisting the blue card because they don't want a fiasco like the H-1B program foisted upon them. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Blue Card Scare
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.