Police Officers Pour on the Training in Shaler

By Bruckart, Aaron T. | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 2, 2008 | Go to article overview

Police Officers Pour on the Training in Shaler


Bruckart, Aaron T., Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Police from all over Allegheny County gathered recently at the Shaler municipal building for training in how to administer standardized field sobriety tests.

The training was part of a three-day course that updates police in the region on how to properly administer the tests and what to look for to determine if a driver is drunk.

"We hold them as frequently as we can get them put together," said Cathy Tress, Western Pennsylvania law enforcement director for the Pennsylvania DUI Association.

The training isn't targeted at learning to identify drivers who are "hammered" as much as helping officers to spot the drivers who are a little "buzzed."

"The buzzed drivers are the most dangerous on the road," Tress said. "They're the risk takers."

The sobriety test is done in three parts. First, the officers have drivers follow a pen with their eyes. During this test, officers are watching the eyes of the drivers for involuntary jerking of the eyes, one visible sign of impairment.

After that, drivers are asked to walk in a straight line, heel to toe. Then they're asked to turn around and walk back.

Lastly, drivers are asked to stand on one foot and maintain their balance.

These sobriety tests have been the national standard for the past 20 years since members of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration did group studies to determine the most accurate method for measuring impairment.

The training sessions use real people for the best real-life simulations. Volunteers are asked to come in and drink so that police can administer the tests. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Police Officers Pour on the Training in Shaler
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.