Road Trip: New Map Tour Explores Appalachia

By Felberbaum, Michael | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 4, 2008 | Go to article overview

Road Trip: New Map Tour Explores Appalachia


Felberbaum, Michael, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


RICHMOND, Va. -- Bustling textile and furniture factories that used to churn out blankets and beds have moved out of southwest Virginia, taking jobs overseas.

But that doesn't mean there's nothing left in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Along with the enduring traditions of hard work and faith remains the tangible treasure of bluegrass.

"Music is the most valuable commodity that we have to sell here in these mountains," said Debbie Robinson, program coordinator for Blue Ridge Music Center, one of the many attractions included in a renewed effort to bring visitors to the heart of Appalachia.

A new driving-tour map developed by National Geographic and the Appalachian Regional Commission features 28 suggested routes, all reflecting the diversity of the 13-state region that stretches from southern New York to northeast Mississippi.

The routes include scenic staples such as the Blue Ridge Parkway through North Carolina and Virginia, and lesser-known car trips through historic towns, back roads and artisan trails.

"We're actually placing much more value on our music, and it is drawing people to our area," said Robinson, who also volunteers at the Rex Theater in Galax, Va. The restored movie theater is home to a weekly show featuring mostly live local music acts playing banjo, fiddle and guitar that's broadcast on the radio and via the Internet.

National Geographic was paid $80,000 by the commission to develop the new map, which was distributed this spring to 865,000 subscribers of National Geographic Traveler. It also is available through the commission and state tourism offices.

"Appalachia, in a lot of ways, is one of our most important regions," said Keith Bellows, the magazine's editor. "This is kind of travel ground zero. The idea that you can drive it and see those nooks and crannies of our past, they're all there."

The commission estimates tourism as a more than $29 billion industry in the region, employing more than 600,000 people.

Economic woes have led more people to travel within the U.S. than abroad, sticking with getaways closer to home. And despite rising gas prices, Bellows believes that traveling, even by car, will not slow.

"The truth is we're all going to travel," Bellows said. "We love it. We can't help ourselves. It's something that we absolutely love to do and I suspect that no matter how expensive it gets, we're going to want to explore our own backyard."

In Virginia, drivers can take a trip on the Crooked Road, the state's heritage music trail along the western slope of the Blue Ridge Mountains to the coalfields region. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Road Trip: New Map Tour Explores Appalachia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.