Big Brown Trainer Dutrow Coming Home

By Grupp, John | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 16, 2008 | Go to article overview

Big Brown Trainer Dutrow Coming Home


Grupp, John, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


BALTIMORE - Rick Dutrow's cherubic smile said it all.

In a moment of levity Thursday morning, the trainer for Kentucky Derby winner Big Brown was asked about the craziest scene he ever witnessed during the Preakness's legendary infield party.

"I was probably the one doing it," Dutrow said with a chuckle.

Dutrow is back at the Preakness Stakes, and this time his destination is the winner's circle.

Dutrow, the son of former Maryland training legend Dick Dutrow, will saddle Big Brown on Saturday for the 133rd Preakness -- his first starter in the middle jewel of the Triple Crown -- and add another chapter to a welcome homecoming.

Post time for the 1 {3-16}-mile race is 6:15 p.m. on NBC. Big Brown, undefeated in four starts, is the 1-2 morning-line favorite in the 13-horse race.

"It's fun to see some of my family and my friends," said Dutrow, who hasn't started a horse at Pimlico since going 0 for 2 at the track in 2006. "But I am more interested in the horse and the race. That's why we came."

Dutrow was born in Hagerstown, Md., and attended high school 20 miles away in Columbia.

But he has traveled much further on his return trip to Old Hilltop.

On the way to becoming trainer of the world's best 3-year-old horse, he overcame a bitter dispute with his late father, who expected more from his gifted son. There also was drug and alcohol abuse, the murder of a former girlfriend and multiple suspensions from racing authorities for doping issues. For a while, broke, he lived in a small room at Aqueduct in New York.

"What I've done, I don't have any problems talking about it," he said. "It happened so long ago. It doesn't bother me."

On Wednesday night, after arriving at Pimlico, Dutrow recalled making the short walk from his father Dickie Dutrow's barn during Preakness week. He would look wide-eyed at eventual Triple Crown winners Secretariat and Affirmed, standing in Stall 40, reserved for Kentucky Derby winners, in the Pimlico Stakes Barn.

Now, Big Brown calls the revered stall home.

"I used to come over here when all the big horses would come in and would always dream about having one in that stall," he said. "It's thrilling."

Maryland-based King T. Leatherbury, who battled Dutrow's father for many trainer titles over the years, sees similiarities in his former rival and his Kentucky Derby-winning son. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Big Brown Trainer Dutrow Coming Home
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.