Warhol Hosts Major Mondrian Exhibit

By Shaw, Kurt | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 25, 2008 | Go to article overview

Warhol Hosts Major Mondrian Exhibit


Shaw, Kurt, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


We're lucky in Pittsburgh to have such a rare Dutch treat as "Piet (Mondrian) in Pittsburgh," an exhibition featuring 24 abstract paintings by Dutch artist Piet Mondrian (1872-1944), which opened early this month and will be on view through August at The Andy Warhol Museum.

Who was Piet Mondrian, you might ask? For the uninitiated, just remember those funky bottles and jars of the L'Oreal Studio Line of hair care products introduced in the mid-1980s. You know the ones -- the pared down packages with spare designs of primary-colored squares and black lines.

Never mind that every fashion designer from Yves St. Laurent to Christian Louboutin borrowed the Dutch artist's iconic gridded composition of yellow, blue and red for everything from cocktail dresses to platform shoes.

But really, these may be too crass among cultural associations for one of the key figures in the early development of abstract art in the early 20th century. After all, Mondrian is widely recognized for having prominent influences on postwar art, architecture, design and printing. At the Warhol, we again find Mondrian in a modern-day tabernacle of pop culture -- a perfect fit in that regard.

Much thanks goes to Warhol director Tom Sokolowski, who brokered the deal. When the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam organized "Andy Warhol: Other Voices, Other Rooms," the first major exhibition of Warhol's work in Europe in 40 years, they borrowed heavily from the Warhol Museum's collection. Why not soften the deal, Sokolowski thought, and throw a few Mondrian's our way.

The Stedelijk not only agreed, they talked to their friends in the Netherlands, the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag in The Hague and Museum Boijmans van Beuningen in Rotterdam, who sweetened the deal. Thus, we have pictures on loan that have never made it to these shores before, giving us a rare opportunity indeed to witness the artistic development of this important figure through two dozen representative examples.

"We were very pleased, because there's never been anything like this in Pittsburgh," Sokolowski says. "I think for people to come in and see the range of Mondrian's work -- well, so often when an artist's mature style is so monolithic, you don't really know how he got there. And this really is a wonderful exercise. It exemplifies all of the elements in Mondrian's career."

From his late works, which typify the Dutch artistic movement known as De Stijl of which he was a seminal figure, you wouldn't know that Mondrian started out as an expressionist, let alone a school teacher.

Born Pieter Cornelis Mondriaan in 1872 in Amersfoort, Holland, into a strict Calvinist family, Mondrian was introduced to art at a very early age. His father, also named Pieter Cornelis Mondriaan, was a school teacher who also taught drawing, and his uncle, Fritz Mondriaan, was a painter, having studied under Willem Maris of The Hague School of artists.

From 1897 to 1909, Mondrian painted scenes of Dutch landscapes with mills, trees, farms and the Gien River near Amsterdam as subjects. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Warhol Hosts Major Mondrian Exhibit
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.