Briefs: Impressionist Exhibit Focuses on Works of Women

By reports, and wire | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Briefs: Impressionist Exhibit Focuses on Works of Women


reports, and wire, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Impressionist paintings by four women will be the focus of an exhibition at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco this summer. The exhibition, "Women Impressionists: Berthe Morisot, Mary Cassatt, Eva Gonzales, Marie Bracquemond," will run June 21-Sept. 21.

All four women were born in the 1840s, lived in Paris and were members of Impressionist circles. Morisot was married to the brother of painter Edouard Manet and was close friends with Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Cassatt, who was born in Allegheny City and was the only American among the four, was friends with Edgar Degas and is known for her portraits of mothers and children. Gonzales studied with Manet and is known for her portraits. Bracquemond was self-taught and exhibited with other Impressionist painters of the day, but her husband disapproved and she eventually stopped painting. She is also known for her work in porcelain.

The Legion of Honor is the only U.S. venue for the show, which comes to San Francisco after its debut at the Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, Germany. The Legion of Honor is in Lincoln Park overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge, at 34th Avenue and Clement Street. It's open 9:30 a.m.-5:15 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday; adult admission is $10 plus $5 for the "Women Impressionists" exhibit.

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