Many Clinton Supporters May Be Wary of Shifting to Ex-Rival

By Zito, Salena | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Many Clinton Supporters May Be Wary of Shifting to Ex-Rival


Zito, Salena, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


WASHINGTON -- Toward the end of her speech Saturday announcing that her presidential campaign was over, Hillary Clinton put on her best Democratic Party-unity face and told her troops that they must work for presumptive nominee Barack Obama, echoing his campaign slogan, "Yes, We Can."

Their slogan might be, "Well, not so fast."

Trudging through 100-degree temperatures to the National Building Museum yesterday, thousands of Clinton supporters heard the junior senator from New York and former first lady say she is no longer "in it to win it."

For 17 months, she had been their champion in the struggle for the White House, and the transfer of their support to Obama in the general election is not a sure thing.

"This moment is very bittersweet," said Jordon Sweetman of Ft. Washington, Md., who balanced his 2-year-old son in a backpack as he and his wife, Jennifer, made their way out of the museum.

"I am not completely satisfied with him," Jennifer Sweetman said about Obama. "There is too much glossing over of issues, and no substance. With Clinton, you knew where she stood on everything."

Clinton took the stage yesterday with husband Bill, daughter Chelsea and mother Dorothy Rodham to cheers and applause from thousands.

"Well, this isn't exactly the party I planned, but I sure like the company," Clinton said.

She had won support for her tenacity, her endurance and, yes, because she is a woman in game dominated by men. No other woman has come so close to the presidency.

"I thought the media was just impossible in the way that they treated her," said Carol Turner, 58, of Falls Church, Va., as she stood in line to enter the museum with a handful of friends.

"I wanted to let her know today that I supported her when she was running, and I will be there for whatever she does next. …

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