25 Candles

By Horne, Jean | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 16, 2008 | Go to article overview

25 Candles


Horne, Jean, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Birthdays should not be times for moderation, which explains why Saturday's gala celebrating the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh's 25th birthday radiated joy in every direction.

As young at heart as when it was first conceived a quarter century ago on the North Side, this marvel of ingenuity and creativity continues to inspire tykes to learn while they play. Last year, 225,000 visitors made the city's fave playhouse their own.

Beaming like proud parents in their remarks to 300 black-ties, co- chairs Anne Lewis with Greta and Art Rooney reflected on past successes and projected future ones for the neighborhood with their revitalization of Allegheny Square Park.

Fashionables supplied the wattage during the cocktails as they wended past zany birthday cakes in the grand hall and found their seats in The Studio, The Attic or The Work Shop -- each delightfully designed with a unique theme for the wine-and-dine that was impeccably catered by the Duquesne Club. Birthday cakes? Of course, they appeared as pizzazzy centerpieces made entirely of colorful mums that were "baked" by Flowershow Studio.

This set never heard of the sandman and, apre-dinner, they danced past beddy-bye to the Nick Dialoiso band where we spotted CHP director Jane Werner with Bob Rutkowsky and prez Tom Mole with Kathy; Carol and Myles Berkman (celebrating their anniversary!); Susan and David Matter; Ann and Ron Wertz; Elin and Jim Roddey; Ruth Anne and Ralph Papa; the Steelers' Charlie Batch and Latasha Wilson; Chuck Reichblum and Audrey (she led the community in founding the PCM in '72) ; Lou and Henry Gailliot; Greg Behr; Libby and Mike Mascaro; Gratia and Patrick Maley; Brenda and Dave Roger; and Jen and Brooks Broadhurst.

Plus Drs. Ellen and Loren Roth; Tina and Derek Gaskins; Harris Ferris; newlyweds Christine and Bruce Crocker; Dr. Shelley and Jeff Lipton; Anne's sons Ben and Andy Lewis; Drs. Ellen Stewart and Jeff Cohen; Dr. Frank Costa; Julia Gleason; Nancy Scarton; Renee and Bob Denove; Elizabeth and Denis McCarthy; Shelley and Maurice Peconi; Nancy Sansom; Susan Nitzberg; Glenn and Susan Bost; Beth Ann Fuhrer; and Langley and George Cass.

Let Them Eat Cake

From powdered wigs and bosom-baring bustiers to billowing skirts, the Marie Antoinette-inspired models created a sensation at Friday the 13th's oooh-la-lah Urban Garden Party at the Mattress Factory which, like its parties, is renowned for fearlessly original installation art you can get into.

Hardly a scene from the Palace of Versailles in 1788. Au contraire, Phat Man Dee (dressed in body paint) sang at the patron pre-party that was hosted by Bob Sendall with his usual ne plus ultra graze. But, le hands down, the highlight of the outrageous fashion show was the gown modeled by stunning Taylor Linaburg that was embellished with 15-pounds of Bob's Toffee-Taboo chocolates!

Chairs Jessica Coup and Scott Bergstein stormed the Bastille to stage this creative whirl that had a strolling violinist, accordion player and decadent delights for 1,000 Factory fanciers like founders Barbara Luderowski and Michael Olijnyk with board chair Anuj Dhanda; Tom Sokolowski; Bob Strauss; Sherry DuCarme; Catena Bahneman; Suzy Davison-Donohough; Karla Boos; Diane Samuels and Henry Reese; Tom Sarver; Sara Radelet; Peggy Finnegan; Kelly Frey; and Aldene LaCaria.

-- JoAnne Harrop and J.H.

Page Struck

It was a glamorous, four-star party and you may be sure that nothing was spared to celebrate Jay Dantry's 53-year career and the closing of Jay's Book Stall, Oakland's most famous and beloved book store. So it was with much expectation on Thursday that a glittering group of 70 guests streamed into the spectacular gardens and art- drenched Squirrel Hill manse of a smashing hostess ... and they were swept off their feet.

If you need an introduction, well then, may we ask how long was your nap, Mr. …

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