Obama's Unfinished Waffles

By Reiland, Ralph R | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 14, 2008 | Go to article overview

Obama's Unfinished Waffles


Reiland, Ralph R, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The bloom is off the Obama rose.

It started with people fainting at his mega-rallies and peaked with the plate that he used to eat waffles in a Scranton diner being put up for sale on eBay.

"Winner gets his used diner plate with his used silverware and uneaten portion of waffle and sausage," according to the ad. "Guaranteed authentic. His DNA is on the silverware. This plate was wrapped by the waitress who served him. It was wrapped with Saran Wrap immediately after his departure and is now in the freezer awaiting the lucky winner's bid!! This is 100 percent authentic as you can see he was at the diner by the picture and it was on all local news stations."

Obama's old sausage and waffle pieces were followed on eBay by an oil painting that celebrated the special leftovers.

"The recent eBay auction of Barack Obama's waffle may be no more, but it lives on here as a miniature oil painting," according to the item description. "Created from the actual recent photo of Mr. Obama's half-eaten breakfast, this one-of-a-kind art is not a reproduction but an artistic interpretation of the original. I call it 'Memories of Barack Obama's Breakfast.'"

Those days are gone.

Bob Herbert, a pro-Obama columnist at The New York Times, began his column last week on the presumptive Democrat nominee as follows: "In one of the numbers from 'Fiddler on the Roof,' Tevye sings, with a mixture of emotions: 'We haven't got the man we had when we began.'"

What's different is that Obama is flipping like a newly landed flounder on the dock. He now backs the government wiretaps that he once opposed, he applauds the Supreme Court decision that overturned the District of Columbia ban on handguns, he's now OK with the death penalty for child rapists and he wants to shovel even more faith- based money than Bush to religious groups.

Even the white grandma who used to make him "cringe" is back on top again.

The white grandmother, as Obama revealed in his Philadelphia speech on race in March (the speech about how he couldn't disown his now-disowned minister), was "a woman who once confessed her fear of black men who passed by her on the street, and who on more than one occasion has uttered racial or ethnic stereotypes that made me cringe. …

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