GolfTEC Enters Tulsa Market, Targets Edmond and Norman

By Davis, KirLee | THE JOURNAL RECORD, August 29, 2008 | Go to article overview

GolfTEC Enters Tulsa Market, Targets Edmond and Norman


Davis, KirLee, THE JOURNAL RECORD


With a small black bag of wireless sensors strapped to his back and waist, retired Tulsa attorney Les Hauger lined up with his golf ball on the green practice mat, raised his club and swung.

PGA trainer apprentice Brian Thornburg paid no attention to how the ball sliced into the white backstop. He kept his eyes on the two video replays of Hauger's movements, studying the GolfTEC computer readout of his shoulder and hip rotation, tilt and bend.

Those motion measurements, compared to more than 150 PGA tour averages, helped Thornburg recommend improvements to Hauger's swing.

"The golf swing is the hardest motion in all sport," said Pat McTigue, an 18-year Professional Golfers Association training veteran and the new Oklahoma franchisee for GolfTEC, a growing Denver company with more than 125 locations across the U.S. "What is perceived to be the problem rarely is the problem. Nobody is going to stumble on the correct golf swing by themselves."

That's where the GolfTEC training and instruction comes in, arming PGA-certified coaches with digital video, impact analysis, biofeedback technology and motion-evaluation computers.

"The traditional golf lesson is given by an instructor using only his eyes - and maybe video - so the lesson ultimately relies upon the individual opinion of that one instructor," said McTigue. "The GolfTEC method relies on facts recorded by patented, proprietary equipment that is analyzed by certified personal coaches."

With startup costs of $200,000, Pat McTigue opened his first GolfTEC shop Aug. 15 in 3,100 square feet at 6010 S. Memorial Dr. in Tulsa. He intends to add Edmond and Norman locations within four years, allowing for one store per 700,000 population.

"I will probably start looking at potential locations this time next year," he said, with anticipated opening in 2010.

After 15 years of teaching golf the traditional way in Tulsa, McTigue wanted a system to grow his entrepreneurial skills.

"The more I looked into it, the more attractive it was," McTigue said of GolfTEC's Oklahoma franchise option. "I talked to several store owners. The outcome was to do it before someone else does."

He projects first-year revenue of $300,000, with his break-even point coming after two and a half years.

"Oklahoma is the best undeveloped territory for that company," he said. "Within two weeks of me signing that agreement, there were two very serious inquiries about Oklahoma, so I got in under the wire. …

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