Federal Civil Rights Filings Fall in Oklahoma Courts

By Price, Marie | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 11, 2008 | Go to article overview

Federal Civil Rights Filings Fall in Oklahoma Courts


Price, Marie, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Fewer civil rights cases are being filed in Oklahoma federal courts, dropping almost 31 percent from 2003 to 2006.

In Oklahoma, 756 cases were filed in 2003, including government- filed and private-plaintiff litigation. By 2006, the state total fell to 523.

That eclipses the 20-percent overall decline in U.S. civil rights cases over the same time span, reported recently by the Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Two Oklahoma attorneys attribute the drop at least in part to the conservative U.S. Supreme Court and changes in federal law.

Nationally, total civil rights cases filed in U.S. district courts fell from 40,516 in 2003 to 32,865 in 2006.

BJS, a division of the U.S. Department of Justice, said most of the change occurred in employment discrimination cases, which rose from 8,413 in 1990 to almost 23,800 in 1996, before declining to 14,353 in 2006.

Civil rights complaints by prison inmates, which are counted separately, declined from 41,679 in 1995 to 25,462 in 1998, settling to about 24,500 cases a year from 1999 to 2006.

Oklahoma City attorney Rand Eddy said there may be a few factors affecting civil rights case filings, in his experience.

"The law, in civil rights cases, is difficult," he said.

As an example, he said that an inmate, to prove inadequate medical treatment, must prove not just negligence, but deliberate indifference, which is more difficult to establish.

Eddy said certain laws also make it more difficult to find government entities liable in civil rights cases.

"Those are not easy cases to prove," he said.

Eddy also thinks there is a predisposition in favor of law enforcement in cases involving people charged with crimes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Federal Civil Rights Filings Fall in Oklahoma Courts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.