Commentary: The Mystery Lady Book Reviews

By Lady, The Mystery | THE JOURNAL RECORD, December 26, 2008 | Go to article overview

Commentary: The Mystery Lady Book Reviews


Lady, The Mystery, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The presents have been opened, new toys already abandoned, the opinionated brother-in-law had too much of your food and drink and you had too much of him, but good news - it's Friday, the day after Christmas, and it's all over. Time to curl up with a good book that has nothing to do with Santa, carols, shopping or wrapping yet another pair of slippers for Grandma.

Here are a couple of suggestions each from four authors who paint word pictures and tell tales better than just about anyone, most with a razor-sharp sense of humor, all with well-drawn, memorable characters - including a Southern city where being a "character" must be a residency requirement.

Empire Falls and Straight Man by Richard Russo

Russo won a Pulitzer for Empire Falls, the gracefully written, funny, moving story of a dying Maine town and the characters that come and go as it languishes, including Miles Roby, whose sense of duty moves him to stay on, running a local grill as others ebb and flow around him like the river that runs through town.

In Straight Man, Russo wickedly depicts the cutthroat politics that surface among the English department faculty of a Pennsylvania college. What would you expect when an authority-averse prof like Hank Devereaux finds himself department chairman, however temporarily? Threats to kill a duck each day until he gets a budget approved? At the very least.

Killshot and Get Shorty by Elmore Leonard

Some believe Killshot may be Leonard's best. As always, there's a great caper at its core, this one involving extortion. But it's Leonard's fully drawn characters, including oddly sympathetic bad guys, that mark his work. In Killshot, those characters include real estate agent Carmen Colson and husband, Wayne, who discover the scheme and go on the lam from a hitman nicknamed "Blackbird" and his sociopathic sidekick (whose girlfriend thinks Elvis has not left the building). An edge-of-the-seat read.

Get Shorty features one of Leonard's great characters, Chili Palmer, tracking not-so-dead-guy Leo Devoe from Miami to Vegas to Hollywood to collect on a bad debt for his jerk boss, Ray Bones. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Commentary: The Mystery Lady Book Reviews
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.