Duquesne Dean Was Class Act to Students, Family

By Vondas, Jerry | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 13, 2009 | Go to article overview

Duquesne Dean Was Class Act to Students, Family


Vondas, Jerry, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Albert Labriola was considered an elite educator and internationally recognized scholar who made a positive impact on students during 39 years at Duquesne University.

University President Charles Dougherty called Mr. Labriola an outstanding English teacher and an authority on 17th-century literature.

"We are indebted to him for his leadership in the college and his dedication to our students," Dougherty said.

Albert C. Labriola of Pleasant Hills, acting liberal arts dean of the McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts at Duquesne University, died suddenly on Wednesday, March 11, 2009, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. He was 69.

Mr. Labriola was dedicated to his university and his country, serving as an Army captain during the Vietnam War, for which he was awarded the Bronze Star for meritorious service.

Mr. Labriola's lifelong passion for Milton, Shakespeare and the 17th-century English metaphysical poets began while he was working on his dissertation for his doctorate.

Despite his numerous commitments to the university and his devotion to his students and to the academic world, Albert Labriola also was regarded as a class act, who used his academic prowess to reflect well on his family, his profession and Duquesne.

"My father was a down-to-earth teacher who never sought notoriety for himself," said his son, attorney Michael Labriola of Fox Chapel. "It was always his wish to serve others."

Born and raised in East Liberty, Albert Labriola was an only child in the family of Albert P. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Duquesne Dean Was Class Act to Students, Family
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.