Iran's Position on Middle East Conflicts

By Larijani, Ali | Hampton Roads International Security Quarterly, April 1, 2009 | Go to article overview

Iran's Position on Middle East Conflicts


Larijani, Ali, Hampton Roads International Security Quarterly


I come from a region where in the past 30 years and specifically in the most recent years it has witnessed the highest number of conflicts. Some years ago we had to defend ourselves against an eight year war waged by Saddam against my country. Later the West waged a war against Saddam for his occupation of Kuwait and later still came the occupation of Iraq itself, which led to the killing and injury of more than 800,000 Iraqis, the flames of another war were tanned in Afghanistan, and more recently in another part of the region, Israel with U.S. design attacked Lebanon, and of course most recently, came the Israeli war against the brave and victimized people of Gaza. These conflicts were waged with different excuses, but terrorism and WMDs were the main casus belli. The main question is: by waging such wars which alone cost Iran 250,000 martyrs did regional security improve? Did terrorism grow weaker? Or were nukes found in Iraq? When occupying Afghanistan, the U.S. claimed that the goal there was to control drugs, fight terrorism and apprehend terrorist leaders. Which of these has been realized?

Back in 200l and immediately after occupation, the production of narcotics In Afghanistan was something close to 200 tons. But in 2008 the figure has shot to 8000 tons. The war against terrorism, by morphing into secret talks between certain NATO members and terrorist representatives, has turned into a painful farce. With their handiwork plainly evident in the Herat prison incident and the subsequent escape of hundreds of inmates. Also, the leadership of terror groups is still very much intact. What goal has been secured then? The new U.S. president has said that his Middle East envoy has been dispatched to the region to hear what different parties have to say, rather than to give orders. This initial approach is a positive signal which demonstrates the wrong past strategies only exacerbated security problems. One must be better aware of the cultural characteristics of different regions and the issues and problems they face. With this, I would like to talk now about the concerns of the region, in the hopes that they will be heeded. By organizing the 1953 coup in Iran the U.S. toppled Mosadegh's nationalist administration and restored the Pahlavi dictatorship. This meddling resulted in Iran being kept back - it also helped the U.S. to gain control of our energy resources and further resulted in decades of repression and torture which claimed the lives of many great Iranians. In 1978, by dispatching a team headed by General Huyser, the U.S. worked to organize another coup, but thanks to the vigilance of the Late Imam Khomeini (PBUH), it was foiled. After the victory of the Islamic revolution, through its embassy In Tehran, the U.S. designed and put in motion a number of efforts to break the country and hatched plots to assassinate revolutionary figures documents of which are available. The U.S. encouraged Saddam to attack Iran and, in the course of the eight year conflict, provided him with every military support. Sometimes, during the course of my nuclear talks with my dear friend Mr. Solana, discussing Islamic concepts, its different disciplines and the issues we have faced throughout the life of the Islamic Revolution, were unavoidable. Such discussions helped with a better understanding of the region. If the new approach is based on an understanding of the realities, as they exist on the ground, it will be rational; otherwise clinging to delusions and issuing orders will not be helpful. After the Revolution the U.S. froze all Iranian assets. The U.S. broke Its nuclear contract with Iran, in the very first days of the revolution. After 9/l1, on the excuse of fighting terrorism and Iraqi WMDs, the U.S. occupied Afghanistan and Iraq. This was a great inconvenience both for the people of the region and the U.S. military. The 33 day war waged by Israel against Lebanon was carried out with U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Iran's Position on Middle East Conflicts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.