Think before You Tweet; Etiquette Still Important

By Kurutz, Daveen Rae | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 18, 2009 | Go to article overview

Think before You Tweet; Etiquette Still Important


Kurutz, Daveen Rae, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Annie Lawry hates when her friends bring social and religious arguments onto Twitter and Facebook.

"It can be kind of harsh and disgusting to read," said Lawry, 25, of McCandless. "Plus, sometimes it gets annoying when (Facebook) is updated every minute."

Social networking permeates the lives of hundreds of millions. Twitter allows users to share messages of up to 140 characters, and Facebook allows users to post pictures and interact with other users, including updates of "What's on your mind?"

But how much is too much to share, and do people really need middle-of-the-night updates about, well, mundane topics?

Etiquette experts are at a loss to define proper Facebook and Twitter etiquette, but those familiar with the services agree some topics shouldn't be broached.

"If it's the sort of thing you might say at a party in front of 35 people, some you know and some you don't, that will generally keep you safe," said Stowe Boyd, a social media consultant from San Francisco.

Launched in 2004, Facebook was designed for the college crowd but boasts more than 200 million active users. Twitter's user statistics are not public, but tweetrush.com, an independent Web site that tracks Twitter updates, showed more than 2. …

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Think before You Tweet; Etiquette Still Important
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