Shining a Light on Stained Glass Artists

By Loeffler, William | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 2, 2009 | Go to article overview

Shining a Light on Stained Glass Artists


Loeffler, William, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The name Charles J. Connick may not resonate like that of Andy Warhol or Frank Lloyd Wright.

But Connick, a Pennsylvania native who died in 1945, left a legacy of masterful stained-glass art in churches and academic buildings in Pittsburgh, Butler and Greensburg. Locally, he is probably best known for the 23 windows he created for Heinz Memorial Chapel on the University of Pittsburgh campus in Oakland.

"He was motivated by the love of the glass," says Nick Parrendo, stained-glass artist and owner of Hunt Stained Glass Studio in the West End. "Oh my gosh. He was tremendous; very humble, but very dynamic in his work."

He speaks of the "melody" achieved by Connick's judicious calibration of exactly how much light was allowed to pass through the glass.

Connick may reap some overdue acclaim thanks to a new book and a series of lectures and tours that celebrate his life and work.

"Charles J. Connick: His Education and His Windows in and Near Pittsburgh," was written by Albert M. Tannler, historical collections director at the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation. A six-part series of lectures and tours based on the book begins Sunday at Calvary Episcopal Church in Shadyside.

Connick created nearly 70 windows for the church. The keynote address will be delivered by English historian Peter Cormack.

"It's not a one-guy story," Tannler says. "It's the story of an amazing art form that flourished in Pittsburgh."

The Steel City was one of the leading centers for glass artists in the United States in the late 19th and early 20th century, Tannler says. Connick designed his stained-glass windows to function as an organic part of the architecture.

"Architectural glass, glass in buildings is not terribly well understood," Tannler says. "Here's a guy who, when he died, the New York Times said he was considered the world's leading craftsman in stained glass. That's pretty strong stuff. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Shining a Light on Stained Glass Artists
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.