American Adds Flights as Other Airlines Lose Traffic, Scale Back

By Pfister, Bonnie | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 13, 2009 | Go to article overview

American Adds Flights as Other Airlines Lose Traffic, Scale Back


Pfister, Bonnie, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Passenger traffic at Pittsburgh International Airport continued to decline through the spring, but American Airlines bucked that trend Friday and expanded service to Dallas/Fort Worth.

Overall, passenger traffic fell 11 percent in May compared to May 2008, with 698,422 passengers enplaning and deplaning, officials with Allegheny County Airport Authority said at a board meeting yesterday. The decrease was driven by the continued downsizing of US Airways, whose traveler numbers declined 16 percent to 210,569 in May.

Southwest Airlines, the second-busiest carrier at the Findlay- based facility, reported its traffic inched down by 2 percent, to 135,550.

Nine of the 13 other airlines at Pittsburgh International posted dips in traffic, but Fort Worth-based American reported a 10 percent increase from May 2008, with 41,835 passengers traveling.

American yesterday began using larger aircraft for two of its four round-trip flights between Pittsburgh and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. While two round-trip flights will continue to use the carrier's 70-seat regional American Eagle jets, two others are on MD-80s, which are twice as large and feature 16 business- class seats. …

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American Adds Flights as Other Airlines Lose Traffic, Scale Back
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