Crisis Situations Test Communication during Possible Anthrax Threats

By Fibbe, Ken | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 13, 2009 | Go to article overview

Crisis Situations Test Communication during Possible Anthrax Threats


Fibbe, Ken, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Using an 800-pound Jersey barrier to simulate a dead cow, emergency workers from 13 counties on Friday began learning how to respond to agricultural bio-hazards.

The "cow" was a potential victim of anthrax. It fell dead at the Lawrence County Fairgrounds in Hickory, supposedly during a fair with 65,000 people.

Hazardous material workers had to remove the concrete block and hose down the surrounding area to sanitize it.

Crews were asked to check out a "tip" involving the discovery of a lab in a nearby shed. Although none of its contents was harmful, emergency responders had to proceed as if they were.

"The Discovery" -- as yesterday's drill was called -- was the first in a three-day series of staged crises. Brian Melcer, the director of Lawrence County's Department of Public Safety, said the drill was a great way to test communication among response teams that rarely work together.

"Now we are seeing where we need to make adjustments in the event of a real disaster," Melcer said.

"Operation Scarlet Harvest" was organized by the federal Region 13 Task Force, a pilot program representing the 13 counties in Southwestern Pennsylvania that aims to unify training and pool resources to improve emergency preparedness.

Patricia McKenty, public information officer for the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, which maintained communications with county workers participating in the drills, said they didn't imitate a true emergency perfectly -- for a good reason.

"In a real scenario, it would be happening a lot faster, but since it's a test we didn't want to rush it and overlook something that may have been an important factor to improving the system," she said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Crisis Situations Test Communication during Possible Anthrax Threats
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.