City Suspends Public Works Employee Convicted of DUI

By Boren, Jeremy | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 13, 2009 | Go to article overview

City Suspends Public Works Employee Convicted of DUI


Boren, Jeremy, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


City officials Friday suspended a Pittsburgh Public Works employee who drove drunk when he left a city-organized golf outing in Butler County.

John F. Barley, 57, pleaded guilty Tuesday to a drunken driving charge police filed against him Oct. 12, but he didn't tell Public Works Director Guy Costa about it until Thursday.

Part of Barley's duties included checking that other city employees and job candidates have valid driver's licenses and haven't been convicted of drunken driving.

"To me that unacceptable. He should have told his chain of command at some point long before it got to this, " said Art Victor, Mayor Luke Ravenstahl's director of operations.

"He had to know that, in the end, there was a good chance that he would lose his license and it would become public," Victor said.

A message left for Barley was not returned. Victor said Barley apologized for the incident in a letter to Costa.

Common Pleas Judge Jeffrey Manning sentenced Barley to 60 days of house arrest but allowed for work release. He is not permitted to drive during his sentence and must pay a $1,000 fine.

Victor said Barley is suspended without pay indefinitely because he must be legally permitted to drive to perform his duties. He hopes to settle on a final disciplinary measure by next week, which he said could range from "an admonishment to termination." Barley, a nonunion employee, may appeal the decision to the Civil Service Commission.

Police pulled Barley over for driving his maroon Jeep Cherokee erratically at 8 p. …

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