Laws Increase Need for Shredding

By Ray Carter The Journal Record | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 18, 2002 | Go to article overview

Laws Increase Need for Shredding


Ray Carter The Journal Record, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Given its association with attempted coverup of financial misdeeds, document shredding has a bad reputation with the general public.

But that impression is wrong, according to officials in the shredding industry.

The National Association for Information Destruction, an industry group representing more than 250 companies in the United States and abroad that destroy confidential information, recently issued a release stressing that document shredding is becoming a required aspect of life in today's business world.

The release said "the overwhelming majority of document destruction that takes place on a daily basis is done so quite appropriately and for good cause."

The group noted that a rash of new laws regarding privacy issues have made document shredding a necessity for many businesses.

Jerry Cowden, owner of Paper Solutions, an Oklahoma City-based mobile on-site shredding and recycling company, said that demand for shredding has increased dramatically since he entered the business in 1998.

"There's lots of legislation that has come down, and a lot of people are motivated by the legislation," he said.

Two laws that are increasing the need for document destruction are the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which requires health care providers to maintain the privacy of all medical records, and the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (of 1999), a financial regulation measure. The provisions of both bills are still being implemented.

Cowden said the legislation has been prompted by the growing threat of identify theft. There were 750,000 identify thefts last year according to the Federal Trade Commission.

Court cases have held that companies that simply throw old records into the garbage have made a "public disclosure" of those documents. As a result, a company could be liable for any information gleaned from those records used to commit identity theft.

In 1995, Cowden was the victim of identify theft, "and it's no fun." That incident resulted in $30,000 worth of bad checks written in Cowden's name. Although he did not lose money, the incident still hurt his ability to do business.

"When you send checks to vendors and they're returned for insufficient funds, they don't always believe that ID theft was the reason that the check bounced," he said.

Cowden said he does not know how his personal information was stolen, but he noted that the signatures on the checks were a good forgery, meaning the thief had probably obtained documents with Cowden's signature on them.

The identify theft occurred in 1995, and eventually led Cowden to become involved in document disposal in 1998.

When he started Paper Solutions, the company had only one competitor in the state, Cowden said. Now there are five.

Today, Cowden's customers range from large corporate accounts to individuals. Currently, Paper Solutions disposes of 40 to 50 tons of documents per month, and Cowden expects that number to double in the next year.

"A lot of people are doing it to protect their own information. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Laws Increase Need for Shredding
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.