Cemara Inc. Wins Innovator Award for Benefits Management

By Mitchell, Jessica | THE JOURNAL RECORD, March 27, 2002 | Go to article overview

Cemara Inc. Wins Innovator Award for Benefits Management


Mitchell, Jessica, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Health insurance premiums continue to skyrocket as employers struggle to control costs in order to maintain group health insurance for their employees.
Cemara Inc. claims its comprehensive health benefits management and administrative services streamline the procurement and administration processes and helps employers gain control over health premium inflation.
The Tulsa- based company says its comprehensive full-service approach to benefits management, with particular emphasis on managing health costs, differentiates it from its competitors.
"To compete, the typical broker would have to acquire a third-party administrator, buy case management and utilization review services, develop Web- based technology, establish a call center and hire a consulting staff," according to the company.
Cemara provides clients with services and technology that allows employers to communicate and administer benefit programs for its work force. Its services allow employers to tailor benefits to emphasize employee accountability and implement self-directed, defined contribution programs; medical and benefit savings accounts; and multiple health plan choices. Under a defined contribution program, employers provide a set dollar amount to an employee to purchase and administer benefits.
"Using Cemara services, employees accept more responsibility for their health care benefits, leading to greater employee satisfaction. Employers gain greater control over their benefit spending and are able to reduce overall benefit costs," said Ron Houghton, executive vice president.
The primary modules of the Cemara benefits management technology include:
l Benefit Analyzer - analyzes and benchmarks employer health care utilization patterns and recommends cost-effective plan designs.
l Benefit Shop - allows employees to select their benefits.
l Benefit Elections - allows employees to do "what if" analysis to evaluate the financial impact of their decisions.
l Benefit Center - allow employees to administer their benefits and monitor the status of their benefits-related activities.
l Online Enrollment - allows employers to centrally manage their benefits-related activities throughout the work force. …

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Cemara Inc. Wins Innovator Award for Benefits Management
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