This Nonsense Just in

By McNickle, Colin | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 20, 2009 | Go to article overview

This Nonsense Just in


McNickle, Colin, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


CBS Radio News filed a "special report" during the noon hour on Thursday. The really big, breaking (cue the sound of shattered glass) news? A fella heckled President Obama at a Maryland appearance.

Seems Mr. Heckler had invoked the same sentiment that Rep. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., did during the president's address to Congress the week before last.

"Obama, you lied!" the man shouted, as the president told a tale of a chemotherapy patient supposedly wronged by the existing and dastardly physician-insurance complex.

If past is prologue, Mr. Obama was telling another tallish tale that selectively used only the embellished facts that supported his argument (and even then, not very well).

If there was to be a "special report" at all, it should have been from a discerning radio news network announcing it had caught Barack Obama in yet another misrepresentation to which most reasonable people instead would apply that seemingly verboten three-letter word -- l-i-e.

Not to be outdone, "NBC Nightly News" offered a rather curious juxtaposition out of its lead story on Wednesday night about race- baiting gum-flapper Jimmy Carter essentially labeling anyone who has any criticism of Barack Obama as "racist."

Anchor Brian Williams segued into the story (that it long had ignored) about ACORN's latest outrage -- turning a blind eye to those acting as if they were seeking to set up brothels with little foreign girls in taxpayer-subsidized housing and evading taxes, too.

Mr. Williams introduced the segment noting the subject matter also was tinged by "racism." There was absolutely nothing in the story to, as we say in this business, back up his lead. …

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