German Traditions Thrive at Harvest Festivals

By DeSimone, Dave | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 22, 2009 | Go to article overview

German Traditions Thrive at Harvest Festivals


DeSimone, Dave, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


For the past 593 years, the Durkheimer Wurstmarkt has highlighted Germany's wine-harvest celebrations.

Against a backdrop of carnival rides, twinkling lights and tents with live music and dancing, last week's festival kept traditions alive with the consumption of tons of sausages and copious amounts of riesling wine.

In our own backyard, 19th-century German immigrants transplanted the same joyous harvest spirit with traditional foods, wines and celebrations. Today, the traditions continue.

Cheese monger Carol "Dearheart" Pascuzzi at Pennsylvania Macaroni Co. in the Strip District carries a variety of traditional German harvest kase or cheese.

"The cheeses go from mild to strong, so have fun trying each one to experience the differences," she says.

Butterkase or "butter cheese" offers the mildest flavors in a semi-soft, creamy texture. It adds a delicious touch served diced as part of hors d'oeuvres with sliced sausages, fresh grapes and sourdough bread.

Bierkase or "beer cheese" offers a semi-hard texture with rich, creamy flavors and pleasant, pungent saltiness. It pairs marvelously with dark, crusty German bread with dark mustard.

Finally, Tilsiter or Tilsit offers medium-firm texture pocked by irregular holes and cracks. Pascuzzi's Mt. Mecklenbuger brand Tilsiter reveals pungent aromas leading to strong, yet delicious, creamy flavors that also pair well with crusty bread.

Not far from Pittsburgh just down the Ohio River, Old Economy Village in Ambridge will present a German Harvest Celebration from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday. The event includes visits to the community's old cellars where the Harmonists produced a variety of wines, beers and spirits.

Old Economy Village's roots date to the early 19th century, when George Rapp (1757-1847) and several hundred Harmonist followers left Wurttemberg near Stuttgard. Pursuing their Utopian vision in the New World, they eventually settled in Old Economy after several dramatic land deals.

The celibate Harmonists believed in creating prosperity through commerce, but held all property in common for the entire community's benefit. Rapp was well versed in vineyard work, so their commercial activities included planting vines and making wine from the Pink Catawba grape. Large casks in the cellars held anywhere from 500 to 3,000 gallons of wine.

As stalwart Germans, the community drank beer daily with meals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

German Traditions Thrive at Harvest Festivals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.