OKC Events September 1, 2004

By Gilmore, Joan | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 1, 2004 | Go to article overview

OKC Events September 1, 2004


Gilmore, Joan, THE JOURNAL RECORD


For the 26th year, Arts Festival Oklahoma will take place during the Labor Day weekend on the campus of Oklahoma City Community College. Admission to the family-oriented festival is free. Parking fee is $3 per vehicle. Festival hours are 3-9 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.- 10 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Sunday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday.

Headlining the entertainment this year will be country music star Ty England who will perform at 8 p.m. Sunday. Formerly with Garth Brooks' band, England has several albums available. The most recent one, Highways and Dance Halls, reunites England with old friend Garth Brooks.

Traditionally, the Oklahoma City Philharmonic concert has been a highlight of Saturday evening and this year is no exception. The musicians will perform at 8:30 p.m. Saturday. And, again following tradition, the evening will conclude with a dramatic fireworks display. Brasil Brazil will bring a Carnival mood to the festival as this group of performers, featuring singers Ana Gazzola and Sonia Santos, provide popular Brazilian music on opening night at 8 p.m.

A variety of other entertainers also will perform throughout the weekend. The festival also will feature some 260 visual and performing artists on six stages, food booths and a children's activity tent which will have a $1 admission fee.

Sponsors of Arts Festival Oklahoma are the Central Art Association, South Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce, OKCCC and Women of the South. For more information, call 682-7536.

A jazzy evening

'Twas a swingin' evening at the Dallas Museum of Art's late Friday night. Jazz music prevailed throughout the halls in recognition of the major exhibition, The Art of Romare Bearden, who is considered one of the most important African-American artists of the 20th century. Interestingly, the exhibition has an Oklahoma City connection.

At the entrance is this statement made in 1968 about the artist and his art by Ralph Ellison, Oklahoma City prize-winning author who made his adult home in New York City. Ellison said about the artist: Bearden's combination of techniques is eloquent of the sharp breaks, leaps in consciousness, distortions, paradoxes, reversals, telescoping of time and surreal blending of styles, hopes and dreams which characterize much of Negro American history.

Indeed, the exhibition includes nearly 150 paintings, collages, collotypes, monotypes, watercolors and sculpture by Bearden (1912- 1988). …

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