Oklahoma May Be Paying Inflated Rates on Outsourcing Pacts

By Carter, Ray | THE JOURNAL RECORD, November 16, 2004 | Go to article overview

Oklahoma May Be Paying Inflated Rates on Outsourcing Pacts


Carter, Ray, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Oklahoma taxpayers may be paying inflated rates on contracts that are outsourced to companies outside the United States for pennies on the dollar, giving massive profits to the original vendor, legislators were told Monday.

We've got to figure out who our subcontractors are, said Trish Frazier, senior government relations coordinator for policy and agency affairs at the Oklahoma Public Employees Association. Because you really don't know if we have any more subcontractors that are international at this point, because no one knows who our subcontractors are.

The issue of state government outsourcing first received attention when it was learned the Oklahoma Department of Human Services was utilizing a call center in India to handle the food stamp program, officials told members of the House Governmental Operations and Agency Oversight Committee.

Lisa Henley, project director for DHS, said the agency contracted its food stamp program with Affiliated Computer Services, which then subcontracted with J.P. Morgan. About the time the subcontract was let, J.P. Morgan moved its call centers from Florida to India.

She said the contract does not expire until March 2006.

State Rep. Al Lindley, D-Oklahoma City, and several other officials at the meeting said the use of vendors overseas could create a wide range of problems for Oklahoma government. Somebody in India doesn't have a clue about what's going on in Bugtussle, Oklahoma, Lindley said.

Henley said the India call centers employed by DHS handle simple inquiries and do not deal with benefit requests for the food stamp program.

But Lindley said his constituents have indicated there are problems getting information from the India call center due to language barriers. I've had a number of folks in my district say they have to hang up and call back, he said.

Frazier also suggested other problems could occur due to the transmission of sensitive data outside U.S. borders.

Prosecuting identity theft across national lines would be kind of difficult, she said.

However, Henley said there have been no reports of identity theft as the result of DHS contracts that are handled overseas, even though those vendors may handle more than 200,000 cases per month.

Tom Jaworsky, state purchasing director at the Department of Central Services, said only $3.5 million out of $650 million in state contracts are awarded directly to entities based outside the United States. However, he said state officials do not know how many overseas vendors have been employed as the result of subcontracting. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Oklahoma May Be Paying Inflated Rates on Outsourcing Pacts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.