Commentary: Trying to Consolidate State Agencies a Tough Job

By Pitts, William O. | THE JOURNAL RECORD, November 28, 2005 | Go to article overview

Commentary: Trying to Consolidate State Agencies a Tough Job


Pitts, William O., THE JOURNAL RECORD


Want to tilt at windmills in the Legislature? Try passing legislation combining state agencies and saving taxpayers money. You have about as much chance as Don Quixote.

Ask State Rep. Lucky Lamons, D-Tulsa.

Last session he introduced House Bill 1666 to consolidate the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation and the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics. It requires the two agencies' directors to merge them over an 18-month period, allowing time for a smooth transition.

Shy of enough votes to get his bill out of the House Appropriations subcommittee on Public Safety and Judiciary, chaired by state Rep. John Trebilcock, R-Broken Arrow, Lamons did not seek a vote on it last session, keeping alive the possibility of bringing it up again in 2006.

To no one's surprise the measure was opposed by the directors of the two agencies during the session and again at an interim meeting where they argued there would be no savings.

Eliminating duplicate or overlapping government responsibilities and saving taxpayer dollars makes sense to most, but not necessarily to agency heads, who quickly circle the wagons in common cause to zealously guard their turf.

A 21-year law enforcement veteran, Lamons is not giving up, saying another effort on HB 1666 will be made next year. He makes a good case for the concept of his lengthy bill, but there may be details and specific points that need work and agreement.

There is no intent to do away with or diminish law enforcement but to eliminate the bureaucracy and duplication of functions, he says.

You cannot find criminal action without narcotics, Lamons said. That is why all over the nation narcotics teams and investigative teams are combined into one agency. When investigating shootings, robberies, homicides or any criminal activity narcotics usually play a part. Duplication of efforts at the two agencies simply wastes money and time.

If Wal-Mart ran their offices like we are running these two state agencies you would have sporting goods on one block, electronics 10 blocks down followed by clothing 10 blocks further, he said. They would have their own separate buildings, separate policies and procedures, separate pay staff and separate ways of doing business. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Commentary: Trying to Consolidate State Agencies a Tough Job
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.