Children's Medical Research Institute Receives Donations

By Page, David | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 8, 2006 | Go to article overview

Children's Medical Research Institute Receives Donations


Page, David, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The Children's Medical Research Institute's campaign to raise $30 million is about 80-percent complete after two new donations.

The National Excellence Program's $30 million goal includes $15 million for childhood cancer research and $15 million for childhood diabetes research, said Kathy McCracken, executive director of the institute. The five-year campaign started in early 2003.

We still need about $3.2 million to complete the NEC campaign, McCracken said.

The two donations announced Tuesday include $200,000 from the Hearst Foundation for childhood diabetes research and $50,000 from the Cantrell family of Ada for childhood cancer research.

The decision to allocate money from the campaign for childhood cancer and diabetes research was made after a recommendation from a national advisory committee.

The committee recommended the two research fields because of a large support system in Oklahoma through the OU Medical School and other programs, McCracken said.

The $200,000 donation for childhood diabetes research was made after Catherine Pyke, a program officer with the Hearst Foundation, met in December with McCracken, Terrence Stull, CMRI Patricia Price Browne Distinguished Chair in Pediatrics; Brent Hensley, CMRI board member and president and general manager of KOCO-TV; and Steve Foskin, CMRI board member and vice president of First Fidelity Bank.

The Hearst Foundation's donation will help the institute develop a center for pediatric research.

By giving to diabetes research The Hearst Foundation will increase the quality of years of life of Oklahoma's children and children globally, McCracken said.

According to the Centers of Disease Control, the life of a child with Type 2 diabetes at age 10 will be shortened by 19 years. The Centers for Disease Control estimates one in three children born in the United States five years ago will become diabetic in their lifetime.

The National Excellence Program campaign includes funding to establish a pediatric cancer laboratory at the OU College of Medicine with instrumentation and equipment to complement and enhance the laboratories of the OU Cancer Institute. …

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