Briefs: Go Victorian in New York

By reports, and wire | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 11, 2010 | Go to article overview

Briefs: Go Victorian in New York


reports, and wire, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The picturesque village of Fredonia, New York hosts its annual Victorian Dazzle Festival until July 17.

The festival immerses visitors in the charm of a simpler time with costumes, antique vendors and historic tours of some of Fredonia's finest Victorian homes and gardens. The festival includes the nightly horse-drawn trolley "Ghost Tours" and cemetery tours, antique vendors and appraisers in the park. Also, returning is the popular Lazy Day Dog Parade and Victorian pet-costume contest. Musical entertainment includes music in the park Friday night with Accordion player Joe Iuculano and saxophonist Phil Favata. Saturday's performers include the Cassadaga Area Community Band and classical guitarist David Allen Coester. Organ Grinder Jim Pazderski will wander through the park on Saturday, as well. Art in the Park will feature demonstrations and an exhibit Saturday.

The one-man show "Mark Twain," starring Mike Randall, runs at 8 p.m. Saturday at the 1891 Fredonia Opera House. Tickets are $15. Antique vendors will sell their antiques in the east square of the Village's Barker Common Park from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Details: 716-672-1891 or www.festivalsfredonia.com.

Exhibit displays shows how to spot a fake

The National Gallery is opening an exhibit this week about how experts use technology to properly identify art works and detect forgeries.

"Close Examination -- Fakes, Mistakes and Discoveries," shows how devices such as infrared imaging, X-rays and a gas-chromatography- mass-spectrometer can be used to peel back layers of time in art. One painting on exhibit is "The Virgin and Child with an Angel," which was acquired by the National Gallery in 1924. It was believed to be by Italian painter Francesco Francia until a similar painting hit the market. Last year, an investigation found the museum's work was a fake.

The exhibit opens Wednesday and lasts until mid-September.

Armchair traveler

What's better than a vacation in Paris? …

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