Carnegie Mellon Graduate Mortensen Wins Nobel in Economics Sciences

By reports, and wire | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 11, 2010 | Go to article overview

Carnegie Mellon Graduate Mortensen Wins Nobel in Economics Sciences


reports, and wire, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


A Carnegie Mellon University graduate today was named one of three winners of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences.

Dale Mortensen, 71, an economics professor at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., shared the honor with two others for developing a theory that helps explain why many people can remain unemployed despite a large number of job vacancies.

Mortensen earned a doctorate degree from Carnegie Mellon in 1967. He is the 18th faculty or alumnus from Carnegie Mellon to win a Nobel, according to the university.

"We're extremely proud of the heritage we have here at Carnegie Mellon," said Nicolas Petrosky-Nadeau, assistant professor of economics at CMU.

Today's other winners were Peter Diamond, 70, an economics professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Federal Reserve board nominee, and Christopher Pissarides, 62, an economics professor at the London School of Economics.

The laureates "have formulated a theoretical framework for search markets," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement. "Peter Diamond has analyzed the foundations of search markets. Dale Mortensen and Christopher Pissarides have expanded the theory and have applied it to the labor market. The laureates' models help us understand the ways in which unemployment, job vacancies, and wages are affected by regulation and economic policy."

Said Petrosky-Nadeau: "These three people are what really brought the study of job creation to the forefront."

Mortensen found that labor-market rigidities can cause unemployment as job-seekers look for the best work at the highest pay. The intensity of that job search determines how long workers stay unemployed and in turn can be affected by changes in the level and duration of jobless benefits. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Carnegie Mellon Graduate Mortensen Wins Nobel in Economics Sciences
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.