Time to Vanquish Dems' Vanity

By Reiland, Ralph R | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

Time to Vanquish Dems' Vanity


Reiland, Ralph R, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Here's a thought for Tuesday's voters from Samuel Adams (1722- 1803), a leader in the movements that became the Boston Tea Party and the American Revolution, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and the governor of Massachusetts from 1794-97.

"If ever a time should come," wrote Adams, "when vain and aspiring men shall possess the highest seats in government, our country will stand in need of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin."

"Vain" in the highest seats isn't hard to find.

President Obama says it's the public's fault if Democrats don't do well in tomorrow's election. Rather than blame himself and his congressional allies for ramming through unpopular health care legislation and delivering unprecedented levels of red ink, Obama said the voters aren't thinking straight because they're too scared - - scared stupid, frightened into a lack of clarity.

That's not unlike how candidate Obama described people in "small towns in Pennsylvania" to a private gathering of his well-heeled supporters at a 2008 fundraising party in San Francisco.

For people in Pennsylvania towns where "jobs have been gone now for 25 years and nothing's replaced them," Obama said, "it's not surprising then they get bitter, they cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren't like them or anti-immigrant sentiment or anti-trade sentiment as a way to explain their frustrations."

It's a condescending portrayal of working-class culture, characterized as xenophobic and insular by Obama to his much wealthier audience. Too embittered to think straight, the downtrodden are stereotyped as loading up on guns, clinging to religion and illogically targeting Mexican illegals, Chinese imports and any atypical characters who might show up in their ramshackle towns. …

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