Engaging Children's Books Offer Many Lessons

By Basbanes, Nicholas A | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

Engaging Children's Books Offer Many Lessons


Basbanes, Nicholas A, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Our choices for November feature a nice balance of fiction and nonfiction, all of them driven by a sure sense of story, and all notable for the excellence of the illustrations.

"Nini Lost and Found," text and illustrations by Anita Lobel; Knopf, $17.99, 32 pages, ages 4 to 8.

Anita Lobel follows her Caldecott Medal-winning performance for "Nini Here and There" with a return engagement of her endearing house cat named Nini, a tabby who frightens the dickens out of her owners by slipping out an open door one glorious fall afternoon and goes wandering about all night before finally finding her way back home. It is a story well known to cat lovers everywhere, and we all heave a great sigh of relief when we see the adorable little thing snuggled up warm and comfy in her favorite spot, among fuzzy sweaters in a bedroom bureau drawer. Moral of the story: there is no place like home. Lobel's paintings, as usual, are self-contained narratives in their own right.

"Everything but the Horse," text and illustrations by Holly Hobble; Little Brown, $16.99, 32 pages, ages 4 to 8.

Holly Hobble, creator of the much admired Toot & Poodle series, recalls in this childhood memoir her moving to a farm where there were all sorts of wonderful animals, but no horses, which is what she had wanted most of all. "I fell in love with the woods and fields, with wildflowers and birds and country smells," she writes. "And the biggest excitement of my new life, the best part, was raising animals." When her birthday came along, there was a surprise in the barn, though with two wheels and a shiny red crossbar, not exactly what the girl had in mind. Rich in fabulous watercolor renderings, the story makes clear in terms that children will appreciate that you can't always get what you want, and that compromise is a quality we can admire in everyone.

"Henry Knox: Bookseller, Soldier, Patriot," text by Anita Silvey, paintings by Wendell Minor; Clarion Books, $17.99, 40 pages, ages 6 to 10.

Henry Knox (1750-1806) -- the man for whom Knoxville, Tenn., and the fabled Fort Knox in Kentucky, are named -- gained fame during the American Revolution as the resourceful young general who supervised the transportation of 59 enormous artillery pieces captured at Fort Ticonderoga in Vermont 300 miles overland to Boston during the dead of winter, an amazing feat that led to the evacuation of the city by British troops in March 1775. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Engaging Children's Books Offer Many Lessons
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.