Quick & to the Point: David Horowitz Sees Pamphleteering as Wave of the Future

Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 26, 2010 | Go to article overview

Quick & to the Point: David Horowitz Sees Pamphleteering as Wave of the Future


Write a book about leftist billionaire George Soros? Been there, done that for David Horowitz. But he's revisiting the topic in a form whose time he thinks has come again -- a pamphlet.

The onetime radical who became a conservative firebrand and founded the David Horowitz Freedom Center and Students for Academic Freedom wrote "The Shadow Party: How George Soros, Hillary Clinton and Sixties Radicals Seized Control of the Democratic Party" (Thomas Nelson) with Richard Poe. A best-seller in 2006, the book drew renewed attention this fall when Glenn Beck featured it on TV.

Now, Horowitz is at work on the pamphlet "George Soros: Puppet Master of the Obama Regime," soon to be available through FrontPage Magazine's website (frontpagemag.com). Following are excerpts from the Trib's latest phone conservation with Horowitz.

On the left, the right and Glenn Beck:

Democrats are intolerant. They don't believe in liberty; they believe in government orchestration of our lives and control. ... I sometimes think that I was sent as a former radical to teach conservatives bad manners. The conservatives are just entirely too civilized for the political battle that we're engaged in. ... I started being relieved when Glenn Beck came along. ... I think he's an amazing figure because he's tried to make up for all that he wasn't paying attention to and learn it, and the next day, he does a program on it. So sometimes he goes over the top, but I think what he's doing is not only incredibly admirable but it's the first time that I've seen that, for an audience of 3 million people, there is a conservative voice describing an organized left which goes back through the whole last century.

On Soros:

First, there is no George Soros of the right. There just is not. What Soros has done is he's put together a radical coalition of billionaires, communists of the ACORN variety -- ACORN is part of this coalition -- and has inserted it into a brain center of the Democratic Party, the Center for American Progress, and he's understood that politics is not what happens every two years, which is what Republicans think; politics is trench warfare that goes on every day, every week, and then, at the end, when the election cycle comes around, all the people who've been recruited by the left through this trench warfare will then vote for the Democratic Party.

On why he's writing the pamphlet now:

As a writer, I have been obliterated not only by the liberal media, but I don't even get reviewed in The Weekly Standard or National Review. I haven't been reviewed in 10 years in The Wall Street Journal. The Tribune-Review has been good to me ... but I've been zeroed out of the literary culture. ... I wrote a pamphlet called "Barack Obama's Rules for Revolution." Well, we've sold half a million copies and distributed half a million more of it. So I consider pamphleteering the wave of the future. We post all the pamphlets online. We live in an age where three minutes is what people have. YouTube, which is even more powerful than the pamphlet, is what? It's 10 minutes max. ... (H)ow many people actually sit down and read a book anymore?

NEW PAGES TO TURN: FINANCE, THEN & NOW

Robert Morris: Financier of the American Revolution

by Charles Rappleye

(Simon & Schuster)

A university in Pittsburgh's western suburbs now bears his name, but Robert Morris, born in England in 1734, made his political, mercantile, banking and financial impact in 18th-century Philadelphia, where his economic success and strong Federalist views made enemies for him among business and political contemporaries who would accuse him of embezzlement. His acumen with money led the Continental Congress -- of which he was a member -- to award him the task of financing the American Revolution, and he continued such work for the fledgling U.S. government under the Articles of Confederation. …

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