Photographers' Works Tell a Greater Story in 'Fellowship 2010'

By Shaw, Kurt | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 2, 2011 | Go to article overview

Photographers' Works Tell a Greater Story in 'Fellowship 2010'


Shaw, Kurt, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Ask portrait photographers about their job and they will tell you it takes a special breed of photographer, an especially patient one, to really capture the essence of a person -- who they really are, in the moment.

For Laura Heyman, those moments have became all too prescient when she realized earlier this year that many of her subjects, who she photographed in 2009 during a visit to Haiti, were lost or suffered through the Haitian earthquake on Jan. 12.

" 'Pa bouje anko' (don't move again) is what I would say to each person as I was explaining the process that we would go through in order to take the photograph," Heyman says. "And I would tell each subject to choose a pose, and they had to understand that after they made the pose, I would focus the camera, and they couldn't move again. But of course, after the earthquake, (those words) became resonant on a number of different levels -- in that the earth wouldn't move again, in that the country would not be crushed again by the various political or natural disasters that have plagued it since it first came into being."

Heyman is the grand-prize winner of Silver Eye Center for Photography's Fellowship 2010, an annual juried exhibit, which carries an award of $3,500. Her work, which is on display in Silver Eye's "Fellowship 2010" exhibit, was selected by juror Deborah Klochko, executive director of the Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego, from submissions by 258 artists representing 32 states and 12 foreign countries.

Heyman, who lives in Syracuse, N.Y., is an artist, curator and associate professor of photography in Syracuse University's College of Visual and Performing Arts. Her initial visit to Haiti was at the invitation of the artist-organizers of the Ghetto Biennale, a festival that took place in Port-au-Prince in November and December of 2009.

The festival's premise was to explore "what happens when artists from radically different backgrounds come together ... when 'first world' art objectives encounter 'third world' artistic reality, and when Western artists try to make art in the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere."

Heyman's response to this question and to the complexities of cultural representation was to set up a simple, outdoor studio in a courtyard off a main boulevard in the Grand Rue neighborhood. She put out the word that residents could have their portraits made for free, and every day, she met with and photographed individuals and groups using a vintage 8-by-10 field camera. The negatives were then processed and contact printed in a makeshift darkroom set up in her hotel room, so that each sitter would receive a portrait before the artist left the city.

Much like celebrated West African photographer Seydou Keita (1921- 2001), whose portraits of his fellow villagers in Bamako, Mali, have taken on an iconic status well beyond their humble beginnings as simple studio photography, Heyman portrays her subjects with consideration and respect, capturing their inherent beauty while documenting their life at a specific moment. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Photographers' Works Tell a Greater Story in 'Fellowship 2010'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.