CD Reviews: 'Duets' an Impressive, Imposing Work

By reports, and wire | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 16, 2011 | Go to article overview

CD Reviews: 'Duets' an Impressive, Imposing Work


reports, and wire, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


'Duets (Pittsburgh) 2008'

Ben Opie and Anthony Braxton (OMP)

"Duets" is a recording that is difficult, if not impossible, to classify. Its two compositions by avant-garde reed player and educator Anthony Braxton are neither jazz nor concert music. Yet, it also is both of them. The story of the recording is nearly as good as the play on this disc. It was recorded at a studio at Carnegie Mellon University in 2008, when saxophonist-teacher Opie brought in Braxton for a string of concerts. They recorded these duets, which are 54 and 61 minutes long, respectively, in one day. The striking bits of avant-garde performance were done in one take each, separated by lunch. "Composition 220," which includes parts of two other works, is a long series of variations on a staccato theme. "Composition 340," which also includes a incursion by another work, is built more around the technical skills of the two and denser melodic and rhythmic statements. Both are stunning bits of virtuosity, but, be warned, can not to be taken lightly. The music churns through statement and restatement, never relaxing. That is what makes it so compelling. Opie talks about how Braxton's approach to these one-take recordings states his idea of having a performance be the life of a composition, rather than trying to make the composition dictate the performance.

"Duets (Pittsburgh) 2008" is available at Paul's CDs, Bloomfield, at www.cdbaby.com and at www.benopie.bigcartel.com.

Opie will have a CD release concert featuring Braxton's "Composition 50" at 8 p.m. Jan. 23 at the Kresge Theater on the Carnegie Mellon campus. Admission is free, but donations are suggested. Details: opek.music@verizon.net.

-- Bob Karlovits

'Endlessly'

Duffy (Mercury)

Aimee Ann Duffy's sophomore release can't match her mega-selling 2008 debut album "Rockferry" for stylistic cohesion. The Albert Hammond-produced album by the Welsh woman has a bit of an identity crisis. It's split between Lulu-esque retro soul-pop moves, such as the quivering "Breath Away," and more forward-thinking ventures, such as the funkified "Well Well Well," recorded with ubiquitous Philadelphians the Roots. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

CD Reviews: 'Duets' an Impressive, Imposing Work
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.