It's a Living: Sculptor Paul Moore

By Brus, Brian | THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

It's a Living: Sculptor Paul Moore


Brus, Brian, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The honorable Brad Henry, 26th governor of Oklahoma, will remain in the Capitol rotunda long after his term, thanks to Paul Moore.

Moore, a professor of figurative sculpture at the University of Oklahoma, fashioned Henry's likeness in bronze as a life-sized bust for the State Capitol Preservation Commission and the Oklahoma Arts Council. Moore said he's proud of his latest work, which was unveiled earlier this month.

Moore has also sculpted former Oklahoma congressman Carl Albert for a collection in Washington, D.C., and Warner Bros. animator Chuck Jones for the Smithsonian Institution, as well as many other famous figures over more than three decades. A board member of the National Sculpture Society and a member of the Cowboy Artists of America, Moore estimated he has sculpted more than 110 commissions for numerous municipal, corporate, private and international collections.

For the past 10 years, Moore has been working on the Oklahoma Centennial Land Run Monument, many pieces of which are already on display along the Bricktown Canal near downtown Oklahoma City. The entire work will be comprised of 46 bronze pieces, each one-and-a- half times life-size. When complete, the work will measure 365 feet in length by 36 feet in width and more than 16 feet tall, one of the world's largest bronze sculptures. Moore said it is probably his most difficult project, mainly because of the time investment. It is expected to be completed in 2015.

"It's an endurance test for me, just getting through it," he said. "My body's wearing out. One thing I didn't take into consideration is that I'd be getting older as the work progressed. …

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