University of Central Oklahoma Sociology Professor Provides Relationship Research

By Page, David | THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 21, 2011 | Go to article overview

University of Central Oklahoma Sociology Professor Provides Relationship Research


Page, David, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Research by a University of Central Oklahoma sociology professor is getting national attention.

Amanda Miller's research, titled "Waiting to be Asked: Gender, Power and Relationship Progression Among Cohabitating Couples," explores how working and middle-class cohabitating couples negotiate the progression of their relationships. Sharon Sassler at Cornell University is co-author of the research.

Rather than grand gestures and surprise proposals, many of today's couples lean on negotiation and planning when to get engaged and married, according to the research by Miller, an assistant professor of sociology at UCO.

The research has been receiving attention including interviews for the syndicated National Public Radio show Here and Now, the Sydney Morning Herald in Australia and the Wall Street Journal, as well as references in the book A Little Bit Married by Hannah Seligson.

In her interview on NPR's Here and Now, Miller said an engagement negotiation is a situation where couples mutually decide when to marry and sometimes how their engagement will take place.

Miller said the approach is more common among middle-class couples, as female partners in those relationships are typically as educated as and have professional occupations like their partners, thus providing them with greater power than their working-class counterparts.

"With their greater power comes a newfound confidence, causing women to be the usual instigators in bringing up the talk of marriage or moving into shared living arrangements," said Miller. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

University of Central Oklahoma Sociology Professor Provides Relationship Research
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.