Towards a Stable Afghanistan?

By Habig, Cornelia | Hampton Roads International Security Quarterly, April 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

Towards a Stable Afghanistan?


Habig, Cornelia, Hampton Roads International Security Quarterly


There is no question that the military commitment in Afghanistan must come to an end at some point. Yet how to achieve the country's permanent stabilization is an issue not yet resolved. The debate centered on a regional approach.

While Saturday's agenda focused on the changes in the Arab world, Afghanistan was the key issue of the speeches and debates on the last day of the conference. Germany's Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle stressed the importance of a change of strategy while Afghan President Hamid Karzai put forward a surprising argument, saying that from his point of view, 'parallel structures' had emerged in his country, which slowed down a more rapid progress in nation building. With this term, Mr. Karzai did not refer to the narcotics industry or a similar issue, for instance, but to the NATO member states' Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRT), the presence of private security companies, and funding channels that bypassed the Afghan authorities (and directly sponsored specific projects instead). The transition to Afghan responsibility had to be accelerated, the Afghan President suggested. He did not, however, go into detail on the issue of the Afghan institutions' present ability to fulfill these roles.

Afghans will have to find their own way

The second panel discussion on Afghanistan started late in the morning. Among others, the debate featured NATO's Supreme Allied Commander Europe Admiral James Stavridis, U.S. Undersecretary of Defense for Policy Mich le Flournoy and Afghan National Security Advisor Rangin Dadfar Spanta. Mr. Karzai's theses played an important role but were put into perspective. According to Mr. Spanta, the President intended to encourage the transfer of responsibility from the PRTs and operational forces to the Afghan government forces. Afghans were a proud people and wanted to find their own way.

Regional approach for authority transfer to Afghan forces

The participants agreed that a permanent military mission did not make sense in the long run. It was the Afghans' job to ensure the country's sustainable stabilization whereas NATO and its partners were limited to rendering support. The districts had to examine individually which strategy to choose in order to effect a transfer of responsibilities to the Afghan government and its security personnel. People had to become confident with the local sytem represented by their government, Ms. Flournoy explained. NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe Admiral Stavridis reported from his visit to the trouble spot provinces of Kandahar and Helmand in Southern Afghanistan one week ago, where he encountered significant progress. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Towards a Stable Afghanistan?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.