Time for a Federal Industrial Policy

By Love, David A | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 17, 2011 | Go to article overview

Time for a Federal Industrial Policy


Love, David A, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


President Obama needs to go further than criticizing millionaires and oil companies. He needs to propose an industrial policy.

In his June 29 news conference, Obama was right to come out against tax breaks for millionaires and billionaires, corporate jet owners and oil and gas companies. What is passing as the free market these days is a system of giveaways to those who don't need it -- the wealthiest Americans, corporations that relocate jobs overseas and banks that are "too big to fail," yet have failed the economy with their predatory practices.

With more than 10 million jobs lost to the recession -- and the private sector sitting on cash -- it is clear that the United States is on the wrong course, a course that won't be corrected with more tax cuts and deregulation. America needs a plan. And it must generate growth by selling and exporting things people will buy rather than through credit-fueled consumption and a reliance on fossil fuels.

This is where industrial policy comes in.

Industrial policy is when a government fosters the development of certain industries or sectors -- through loans, subsidies or other support mechanisms.

The main idea is that organized and coordinated government intervention -- particularly in collaboration with the private sector -- can bring sustained growth that benefits the whole society.

Industrial policy is nothing new. For example, President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal allowed the nation to recover from a crippling Great Depression.

More recently, U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Time for a Federal Industrial Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.