Commentary: The Impact of 9/11 on Commercial Buildings

By Currin, Darren | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 12, 2011 | Go to article overview

Commentary: The Impact of 9/11 on Commercial Buildings


Currin, Darren, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Yesterday was a day of reverence and reflection as our nation took time to pause and remember those who were lost 10 years ago on Sept. 11, 2001, as a result of multiple terrorist attacks on our great nation. One thing was evident during the remembrances in that our nation has experienced some healing since the events of that fateful day; however, the impacts of 9/11 are still strongly felt to this day. Obviously, those events have changed the way we travel by air and changed the way security is handled at events and places all over the country.

These changes have also been seen in the nation's office market and changed the way security is handled, especially at high-profile buildings in major markets. Over the last 10 years, the commercial real estate industry has made incredible strides in enhancing the security of buildings and increasing their preparedness measures in case of an actual emergency. In fact, these measures have gone well beyond office buildings as many major shopping malls and other high- profile commercial buildings that generate a significant amount of traffic have enhanced their security.

Last week, the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) shared an interesting list of some of the most noticeable changes that have been made to building security and preparedness following 9/11. Here is their list:

BOMA International and its industry partners have teamed up to form the Real Estate Information: Sharing and Analysis Center (REISAC), which provides bulletins on terrorist threats and activities.

In many U.S. cities (New York City, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Boston) office buildings now rely more on electronic barriers/optical turnstiles, individual identification, bomb dog services and outside monitoring more than ever for security. Security firms have sought and received DHS Safety Act Certification/ Designation for security programs throughout portfolios to provide the greatest amount of protection to clients and accounts. …

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