Robert B. Parker's Characters Continue in New Books

By Memmott, Carol | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 25, 2011 | Go to article overview

Robert B. Parker's Characters Continue in New Books


Memmott, Carol, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Last year, the world lost Robert B. Parker, beloved author of 70 novels including 39 about the Boston P.I. simply known as Spenser and nine starring Paradise, Mass., chief of police Jesse Stone.

With the blessing of Parker's family, these bigger-than-life characters will solve more cases in future books written by new authors, from Parker's publisher, Putnam.

First up, a new Stone novel: "Robert B. Parker's Killing the Blues" by Michael Brandman, who worked closely with Parker on the Stone made-for-TV movies starring Tom Selleck. The book went on sale earlier this month.

"I'm not saying I'm anything more than a mimic here," says Brandman. "Bob was the grand master who invented what appears to be this effortless style of easy writing which sucks the reader right in."

Then, in May 2012, comes "Robert B. Parker's Lullaby," No. 40 in the Spenser series written by Ace Atkins, the award-winning writer of nine novels including "The Ranger," about a crime-solving Iraq War vet, which was published in June.

"I got into writing crime fiction because of Bob Parker," Atkins says. "For my 21st birthday, my mom waited in line for an hour at a bookstore in Atlanta to get a signed copy of (Parker's) 'Double Deuce. …

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