Fumble Return Ignites WVU

By Sickles, Josh | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 9, 2011 | Go to article overview

Fumble Return Ignites WVU


Sickles, Josh, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


MORGANTOWN, W.Va. -- Just when it seemed like West Virginia had no momentum, the defense came up big.

Redshirt freshman linebacker Jewone Snow's 83-yard fumble return turned the tide and propelled the Mountaineers to a 43-16 victory over Connecticut in the Big East opener for both teams Saturday at Milan Puskar Stadium.

"It was a game-changer," Snow said. "The momentum completely shifted over to our side."

Coach Dana Holgorsen told his team it was one play away from breaking open the game, and the defense took it to heart.

Trailing 10-9, the Huskies drove to the West Virginia 13-yard line. As quarterback Johnny McEntee dropped back to pass, the pocket collapsed, forcing him to scramble left.

As he spun to pick up an extra yard, cornerback Pat Miller put his helmet on the ball, sending it into the air. Snow caught it and sprinted down the sideline to the Connecticut 12 before being caught from behind.

"I didn't even know Snow had the ball until he was 30 yards down field," Miller said.

It was the longest fumble return for West Virginia since 1993, when Mike Collins returned one for 97 yards for a touchdown against Missouri.

"By the time I got to the other 40 or 30, they caught up with me," Snow laughed. "I tightened up, but I tried to keep going though."

Two plays later, quarterback Geno Smith connected with Tavon Austin for a 12-yard touchdown to put West Virginia up, 17-9. Smith said the turnover provided a boost for the sideline.

"In college football, those things happen," Smith said. "That's something that turned the game. You could tell just the momentum shift that happened."

Smith finished with another big statistical day, completing 27 of 45 passes for 450 yards and four touchdowns. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Fumble Return Ignites WVU
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.