Pennsylvania's Wind Power Industry Grows

By Napsha, Joe | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

Pennsylvania's Wind Power Industry Grows


Napsha, Joe, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Call it a burst of energy.

Pennsylvania's wind power industry continues to grow, as more ridges in Fayette, Somerset, Cambria and Blair counties become home to wind turbines.

Industry analysts and observers say that growth -- seven wind farm projects in three years and five under construction -- stems from the state's requirement that utilities buy renewable energy, a production tax credit, and improved technology that makes wind turbines more efficient.

"There's been a flurry of activity recently," said Thurman Brendlinger, program director for wind energy at the Clean Air Council, a Philadelphia-based environmental organization.

Since Pennsylvania's first utility-scale wind farm became operational in May 2000, when eight turbines started generating 10.4 megawatts of electricity in Garrett, Somerset County, the industry has burgeoned. The state has 16 utility-scale wind farms, with 433 tall turbines creating 735 megawatts of electricity that go into the electric utility grid.

That's enough electricity to power more than 220,000 homes a year, based on the American Wind Energy Association's estimate that each megawatt of wind-generated power can provide enough electricity for 225 to 300 typical American homes.

The 300-foot-tall turbines along ridges are visible to motorists along the Pennsylvania Turnpike and Route 22. Companies typically gain access to those choice ridgetops through long-term leases with property owners, industry representatives said.

The state ranks 16th in the nation in wind power capacity, and more projects could come on line next year, said Courtney Lane, senior policy analyst for Citizens for Pennsylvania's Future, better known as PennFuture.

Six of the seven wind farms are spread along the Allegheny Mountains in Blair, Cambria, Centre, Fayette and Somerset counties. Those 210 turbines dot the hills from southern Fayette County northward to within about 25 miles of State College.

Pennsylvania's topography lends itself to wind-generated energy, said Patrick Henderson, the state's first energy executive.

"Wind (energy development) has been what we hoped to see. As it becomes more (cost) competitive, it will become more attractive," Henderson said.

Ridges rising above 2,000 feet are good locations for wind farms, said Gwen Anderson, director of the St. Francis University Renewable Energy Center in Loretto, because wind speeds and duration at that elevation are more constant.

About 4 percent of land in the state has strong enough winds and is available for such development, according to the Pennsylvania Wind Working Group, a coalition of industry, environment and government agencies. Because a wind farm uses only a small portion of property, the group figures the actual percentage of state land covered would be about 0.4 percent of the suitable land.

Pennsylvania also has the electric utility infrastructure to transmit power from wind farms -- and the demand for electricity, said Paul Copleman, a spokesman for Iberdrola Renewables of Portland, which operates the Casselman Wind Farm in Somerset County and is completing the South Chestnut Ridge Wind Farm in Fayette County.

A National Renewable Energy Lab assessment determined wind could generate as much as 6.4 percent of Pennsylvania's electricity needs. Wind farms provided just 0.8 percent of the state's power last year, according to the American Wind Energy Association, an industry trade group based in Washington.

'A significant overbuild'

The wind energy industry is growing in Pennsylvania and other states because of subsidies -- production tax credits and accelerated depreciation on equipment -- and because the states require utilities to offer renewable energy sources, said Jay Apt, executive director of Carnegie Mellon University's Electricity Industry Center. …

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