Tourist to 9/11 Memorial Who Reports Her Gun Could Face 3.5 Years in Prison

By Susman, Tina | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 3, 2011 | Go to article overview

Tourist to 9/11 Memorial Who Reports Her Gun Could Face 3.5 Years in Prison


Susman, Tina, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


NEW YORK -- A Tennessee tourist who says she unwittingly broke New York's weapons laws by visiting the 9/11 memorial with a loaded gun -- legal in her home state -- faces 3 .5 years behind bars for the error, which came to light when she asked guards where she could store her weapon while touring the memorial. The Dec. 22 incident underscores the disparity in gun-carrying laws among states; some, like New York, ban the carrying of loaded guns and don't recognize the permits issued in other states for visitors carrying weapons. Opponents of strict gun laws argue that the right to bear arms, as outlined in the Second Amendment of the Constitution, should take precedence and that it is unfair for people like the tourist, Meredith Graves, to be caught in the middle of different states' regulations. Local media reports have described Graves as a 39-year-old medical student who was in the area for a job interview and decided to visit the site of the fallen World Trade Center towers with her husband, and her loaded .32-caliber pistol. When she saw the signs reading "No guns allowed," Graves asked a security guard where she could check the loaded weapon in her purse, according to the New York Post. Graves was arrested on suspicion of carrying a loaded weapon. She could face a minimum of 3 .5 years in prison. She was freed on bail Wednesday and is due to appear in court in March. Tennessee's Knoxnews.com said Graves got her permit to carry a loaded gun in August 2008 and that it was due to expire in 2012. …

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