Toastmasters Clubs Help People Overcome Public Speaking Fears

The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), January 6, 2012 | Go to article overview

Toastmasters Clubs Help People Overcome Public Speaking Fears


By Ben Calwell bcalwell@cnpapers.com 304-348-5188 Asked to address a group of people, a shy persons inclination might be to run and hide. Public speaking is one of the most anxiety-producing activities a person can do, and for many, it is an experience to be avoided at all costs. Toastmasters clubs, however, are there to help people become confident speakers and better leaders, whether its in a personal or business setting. Jason Krantz of Milton joined Toastmasters to improve his speaking ability as a customer service trainer for American Electric Power. In fact, Krantz, who works in Hurricane, is the president of the Dobson-Craddock Toastmasters Club, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary. The club meets at noon on the first and third Thursday of each month in the South Charleston Public Library, 312 Fourth Ave. In an e-mail, Krantz said, I joined Toastmasters because I wanted to improve my speaking ability by learning to slow down and avoid filler words such as ah, so and um, just to name a few. Since a great deal of my daily work was speaking to groups, it seemed a perfect place to learn. Some of the benefits of joining a Toastmasters club are increased self- confidence, better speaking abilities and enhanced leadership and communication skills. Many people come to Toastmasters so they can be better prepared to speak in front of groups large or small in their current employment. Some members want to improve their general speaking habits due to a stutter or lisp, Krantz said. A typical Toastmasters meeting lasts an hour twice a month. Activities include Table Topics, where members are asked questions on a variety of topics and then asked to speak off the cuff on the topic for at least one minute. They speak for one minute even if they have no knowledge of the topic. This is an exercise in speaking and not graded on content, he said. Members also summarize articles from Toastmaster Magazine in two-minute presentations. Meetings also include Word Master, where members choose a new word to learn and then use it in a speech. Every speaker has an assigned evaluator that uses a Toastmasters manual to grade the speaker. They may evaluate the speaker on many things, such as content, flow, voice inflection, purpose and timing, just to name a few, Krantz said. Krantz said the Dobson-Craddock Toastmasters Club started out 40 years ago as the H.E. Dobson Toastmasters Club, named for its founder, Herbert Dobson. Mr. Dobson was a very influential member of our club and Toastmasters International. Mr. Dobson is no longer an active member and is now in a nursing home. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Toastmasters Clubs Help People Overcome Public Speaking Fears
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.