Survey: U.S. Mormons Feel Discrimination, Hope

By Cnn, Dan Gilgoff | St. Joseph News-Press, January 12, 2012 | Go to article overview

Survey: U.S. Mormons Feel Discrimination, Hope


Cnn, Dan Gilgoff, St. Joseph News-Press


WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Nearly half of American Mormons say they face a lot of discrimination in the United States, though most also say that acceptance of their religion is on the rise, according to a major survey released Thursday.

The survey also found that a large majority of American Mormons think their countrymen are uninformed about their religion and don't see Mormons as part of mainstream society, even as most Mormons also say the country is ready for a Mormon president.

"The survey creates a mixed picture for how Mormons see themselves," said Greg Smith, senior researcher with the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life, which conducted the study. "On the one hand, many tell us they're misunderstood and often discriminated against, recognizing the challenges of acceptance.

"But Mormons also seem to think that things are changing, that more Americans are coming to see Mormonism as mainstream," he said.

The survey comes amid what has been called a "Mormon moment."

Two of the Republican presidential candidates -- Mitt Romney and Jon Huntsman -- attend the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The religion has also cropped up in big ways in popular culture, from the hit Broadway play "Book of Mormon" to the recent HBO series "Big Love," about a fundamentalist Mormon family.

Mormons constitute about 2% of the American population.

The Pew survey found that 46% of American Mormons say they face a lot of discrimination in the United States today, while six in 10 say their fellow Americans as a whole are uninformed about the LDS Church.

Two-thirds of Mormons say their fellow citizens do not view Mormonism as part of mainstream American society.

At the same time, 63% of Mormons say Americans are "becoming more likely to see Mormonism as part of mainstream society," in the words of the survey report, while 56% say the country is ready for a Mormon president.

There are some surprising parallels between how Mormons feel about their place in American society and how Muslims do, according to an earlier Pew survey.

"We do see a remarkable degree of similarity about what it's like to be a minority in society," Smith said. "They are under no illusions" about how the broader public currently feels about them, and know their religions are not widely understood, but they remain optimistic at heart, he said.

They recognize the challenges, "but both groups are relentlessly positive about their future in the United States," said Luis Lugo, the director of the Pew Forum. …

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