My Theory of Climatology and the Driveway

By Wilde, Dana | Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), January 29, 2012 | Go to article overview

My Theory of Climatology and the Driveway


Wilde, Dana, Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME)


Two weeks later the snow was gone again. At least, gone from all of central Maine except our house in Troy, where before Friday's rainsnow there was still an icy crust under the firs and spruces.

As noted here before, it has snowed this winter, but the catch has been that immediately afterward it gets so warm the snow disappears. It's unusual for this to happen so completely so frequently in these parts. No one knows whether this particular mild January is telling us anything about global warming (as it used to be called until too many people were incapable of understanding what the phrase means and the descriptor was tweaked to "climate change"), but it sure seems likely to be part of a trend to overall warmer weather which has been under way for some time now.

Several readers, with helpful intentions I'm sure, reassured me earlier this month with a few pats on the head that climate change, if it's even happening, is a natural occurrence that's nothing to do with us and moreover, to jog me out of naivete, that global warming is a hoax. Don't worry, be happy, we were sagely advised in the 1980s.

Here are some of the points I've heard that are meant to reassure me there's no need to worry about climate change or global warming:

It still gets cold in winter.

Earth's climate has always changed and always will change.

Global warming is just a theory.

There is no proof the exhaust from my car hurts anything.

Scientists are often wrong.

Scientists fake climate research findings.

Global warming is not mentioned in the Bible.

There was no Y2K disaster.

The problem I have with these arguments is that I believe in the existence of computers, cellphones, penicillin, bone marrow transplants and internal combustion engines. I also believe in photosynthesis, DNA, infrared light, blood types, viruses, the theory of relativity and the vibration A440, even though I have never seen any of these actual items or processes with my eyes.

What I mean by this is that the same method of study -- namely, what we call "the scientific method" -- led to microchips, life- saving chemistry, instant communication and so on. So that method has a certain high reliability. It has been applied to Earth's climate, and so the findings of climatologists are very likely to be in the same range of reliability.

Now, if the climatologists were disagreeing about the findings, then we would have a situation where the research was incomplete, the matter was not fully understood and global warming would be "just a theory." In other words, the scientists would not yet be sure whether the proposed explanation was completely accurate to reality or not. Scientists are often wrong about their theories. That's why they keep compiling, analyzing and checking data until they agree on an accurate explanation.

When they agree, a theory is no longer a theory but a fact. In the case of global warming, the vast majority of tens of thousands of climate scientists agree that the Earth's climate overall is warming. For all intents and purposes, global warming is not a theory, but a fact.

Global surface temperatures have been rising fairly steadily since about 1900 -- which is to say, around the time our greenhouse- gas-producing activities kicked into high gear. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, the decade 2001 through 2011 included the first, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, ninth, 10th and 11th warmest years since records started being kept in 1880; 2005 and 2010 tie for the warmest years ever. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

My Theory of Climatology and the Driveway
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.