Lil Lambs Clothing Sale Benefits Community

The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), March 8, 2012 | Go to article overview

Lil Lambs Clothing Sale Benefits Community


By Ben Calwell bcalwell@cnpapers.com 304-348-5188 Not only will there be plenty of childrens spring and summer clothing, maternity wear and nursery bargains at the annual Lil Lambs Consignment Sale this weekend, those who make purchases are also helping the community in a number of ways. The Lil Lambs Circle of Life group at Forrest Burdette Memorial United Methodist Church sponsors the nonprofit childrens clothing sale, which runs from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, March 9 and from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 10, at the church, 2848 Putnam Ave., Hurricane. We are one of the very few nonprofit consignment sales in the area, said Lil Lambs board member Ann Hinshaw. Hinshaw said consigners are area residents, who bring in childrens clothing, maternity clothes and nursery items to sell. Each consigner prices his or her items and gets to keep 70 percent of the selling price. Each person can bring in up to 125 items, Hinshaw said. Prices could range anywhere from $1 up to $20. Consigners are urged to price their items at levels they would be willing to pay if they were shopping at a consignment sale. Childrens clothing sizes will range from newborn to 20. The clothing is suitable for spring and summer. We handle junior [size] clothes, but only for children, she said. Each article of clothing or nursery item goes through a meticulous inspection process to make sure it is in excellent shape. For every consigner, we actually check in every piece of clothing if there are any stains or buttons missing, it goes into the reject pile. It might take us an hour, but were known for our quality. The first 75 people checking out Friday and Saturday each get free, reusable shopping bags. …

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